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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Amy Goodman
Host and Executive Producer for Democracy Now
LINKTV 04/14/2014
Goodman: At the George Polk Awards ceremony Friday, Poitras and Greenwald were joined by their colleagues Ewen MacAskill of
John Seigenthaler
Host of Al Jazeera America News
ALJAZAM 04/15/2014
Seigenthaler: Two major newspapers, The Guardian, and the
Amy Goodman
Host and Executive Producer for Democracy Now
LINKTV 04/15/2014
Goodman:
Katty Kay
Anchor, BBC World News America
MSNBCW 04/15/2014
Kay: So there you have the guardian and "The Washington Post" getting the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service from the Columbia School of Journalism. And the controversy is over as you say, did they support somebody who is effectively treasonous. A traitor to America. The counter-argument that is made by the Pulitzer Board is that they are doing the best journalism around. They are not part of Snowden's story. They are reporting Snowden's story. And that is why they've been given this. They came across and were given access to this incredible story. And whatever you think of Snowden, I think, we would all recognize that we would not be having the debate about NSA surveillance that we’ve had in this country over the past year had it not been for the reporting on Snowden's story. And that’s the argument from Pulitzer. Scarborough: Okay. And obviously had an extraordinary impact.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
ALJAZAM 04/17/2014
Sharp: Former U.S. spy contractor, Edward Snowden having his first known public conversation with Vladimir Putin. Snowden: Does Russia intercept, store or analyze in any way, the communications of millions of individuals? Putin: Mr. Snowden you are a former agent, and in the past I have something to do with intelligence. So we will talk between ourselves as professionals. Sharp: Putin’s refusal to hand over Snowden back in June severely strained ties with the United States. And with the deadlock over Ukraine, only getting worse, that relationship with Washington is unlikely to improve. Peter Sharp, al Jazeera, Moscow.
Amy Goodman
Host and Executive Producer for Democracy Now
LINKTV 04/22/2014
Goodman: The Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper has issued a sweeping order barring agencies under his watch from almost all unauthorized contact with the media. The ban applies to discussion of all intelligence related matters, whether they are classified or not. Violators face a minimum security violation and potential prosecution. Clapper's directive comes just months after he told the senate he would seek to
Jesselyn Radack
Edward Snowden's Attorney. Whistleblower & Former Justice. Dept. Ethics Advisor
CSPAN 04/23/2014
Scheer: What is your view about people saying hey he cut and ran. Jesselyn Radack: My view is that it speaks volumes that the only safe way to blow the whistle right now if you are in national security or intelligence and know that level of information that Snowden did., the only safe way is to blow the whistle from another country. And that’s is a sorry state of affairs for this country to be in. My other NSA whistleblowers, right after Snowden revealed himself, had a press conference to say that they all supported him and understood why he had to go to another country to make those disclosures.
Daniel Ellsberg
Author of
CSPAN 04/23/2014
Ellsberg: Snowden, I believe, looked at these examples, looked at Thom Drake’s example, he looked at Chelsea Manning, he looked at Julian Assange what was going after him, and realized that he had to be out of the country if he was going to put up this amount of information and be able to tell what he had done and why he had done it and to comment as he has been doing to speak now. I was personally 40 years ago, able to speak. I was out on bail, on bond throughout my trial. And I was able to speak to demonstrations and lectures and this and that. There isn’t a chance in the world that Snowden, I think, would have been allowed to do that, as he knew, from looking at Chelsea Manning. He would be in an isolation cell like Chelsea for the rest of his life, essentially. No journalist to this day, 3.5 years almost 4 years now, after this stuff came out No journalist has spoken to Chelsea Manning.
Daniel Ellsberg
Author of
CSPAN 04/23/2014
Ellsberg: No journalist to this day, 3.5 years almost 4 years now, after this stuff came out No journalist has spoken to Chelsea Manning. No journalist has spoken to Chelsea Manning, not in four years. No interviews no nothing. And they won’t either. They are not allowed to speak him in prison now. So Snowden more or less had to be out of the country. He learned from that. He also learned that you need to put out a lot of documents, that they should be current documents. And all the more reason he had to be out.
Daniel Ellsberg
Author of
CSPAN 04/23/2014
Ellsberg: I identify with Snowden completely. And I identify with Chelsea Manning, with all the differences in our background and our personalities and whatever. I identify with them very strongly. I feel that they went over the same trajectory that I did. They acted for much the same reason. They did what I would have done in their circumstance and so forth. And so when it’s patriots or traitors, I realize I’m back explaining why I don’t think I’m a traitor. If they’re not a traitor, if they’re a traitor, where am i? I've been saying for three years now, Chelsea Manning and now Snowden is no more a traitor than I am -- and I find that I have to say, and I am not, to make that very clear. The fact is it has taken me back 40 years. I kind of got out of fearing that question all the time. But I did hear it a lot at the beginning with reporters asking and they were saying how does it feel to be regarded as a traitor. by the way, i was not charged in court. It happens that the constitution narrows the legal definition of traitor very significantly.
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